Getting the garden planted

Do you have your garden in yet? I got part of mine in right before the recent rains for once. Usually the day I’m able to plant happens to be right after a big rain, so this year it worked out perfectly.

With the 10-day forecast showing lows staying near 50 degrees or above, it was time for those warm season vegetables. One evening after work, I got all of my tomato plants in the ground – 16 in all. It may soimg_4217-copyund like a lot, in fact it’s more than I have ever planted, but I am running low on all of my tomato-based canned foods, such as ketchup, salsa, canned tomatoes, tomato sauce, pasta sauce…Well you can see why I need so many plants. Let’s hope I can keep up with all of the canning when they start really producing.

In addition to tomatoes, I also got my pepper plants in the next evening, as well as my dill. Do you do companion planting? I try to do a little, and one of the good matches is supposed to be peppers and dill, so I planted my dill plants in between the rows of peppers. It’s supposed to repel some of the bad insects and attract some of the good ones. 

My pepper patch keeps expanding each year. I want to try some new varieties each year, but I also have to have some of my favorites, which are most of them. Therefore, I ended up with quite a few peppers this year, but that’s OK. After eating some and freezing some for the winter, my husband will smoke a bunch of peppers, which I will then dry and crush to make a variety of homemade rubs and seasonings. It’s fun to try all of the different combinations; just keep notes of what you do so you know what you like and what you don’t.

After all of this rain, I can’t wait for the sun to come out and watch the plants shoot up. They always love the rain water.

Now it just has to stop raining long enough for me to get my beans (dry and green beans), corn, okra and melons in the ground. I’m excited to see what my expanded garden produces this year.

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Resist those urges

Spring garden season in Kansas is always interesting. The weather usually warms in April, so it seems safe to plant those warm season crops. If you’re like me, you’ve had them for a few weeks already and can’t wait to get them in the group. But DON’T DO IT!

I was looking back at my gardening calendar from laimg_5799st year and saw that I did plant tomatoes about this time. Yes, even I have trouble taking my own advice. The problem in Kansas is you never know what the weather is going to do. After planting on April 25 last year, we then had a frost about a week later. Every good gardener knows tomatoes and frost do not go together. 

This year, thanks to my new greenhouse, I have been able to be a little more patient. My goal is the second week of May to plant, but we’ll see how that goes. It is a good thing I didn’t plant as early as last year though because the temps dropped today and the low to nights this week has been 39 degrees, which also brought with it frost. (Then back up to a low of 53 degrees in two days; it’s crazy around here this time of year.) While 39 degrees is not freezing, it is getting dangerously cold, and out in the country where we are it always seems to get a few degrees colder than the forecast. All of that concrete in towns always keeps it a bit warmer. 

So keep your fragile seedlings in a warm place and try to resist those urges. You will see the rewards in the end for your patience – jars and jars of tomatoes, ketchup, pizza sauce and more.

Keeping the greenhouse warm even on cold nights

20170317-215457-78897553.jpgSpring in Kansas can create a challenge for getting an early start on plants. Once the weather begins to warm up, the urge to start planting just can’t be denied. But unfortunately, just because there is a couple of weeks of warm weather, does not mean winter is over. The temperatures always drop below freezing at least one or two more times. Even in the green house, that is too cold for tender seedlings to survive.

So I set out on a mission to learn how to heat the greenhouse. I didn’t want to keep it hot, just above freezing. My goal was to keep it at at least 40 degrees over night, even when the lows dropped into the 20s.20170317-215458-78898396.jpg

I researched a number of heaters and finally settled on a heater that ran off of propane that seemed like it would heat the area. While it provided quite a bit of heat, it ran off of small propane tanks or grill-sized tanks. Those only lasted about two nights, so that was very economical or feasible.

After a visit to a friend’s greenhouse, I learned he used a blue flame heater, which was hooked up to a larger propane tank. With that, I knew I had to think bigger than just a portable heater. I decided to have a propane tank installed and a line run to the greenhouse. I have a small, wall-mounted blue flame heater that works well to keep the greenhouse warm when the temperatures are in the 30s. It usually stayed about 10 degrees warmer than it was outside.

When it recently dropped into the 20s, I did supplement it with a couple of electric space heaters, which kept it in the 40s. Another thing that helps is to put a fan in front of the heater to help circulate the warm air. Now my seedlings have a warm place to continue growing until they can go out into the garden.

It’s amazing the difference

It’s amazing how much difference some cooler weather can make. I’ve been watering for hours each day with my soaker hoses, but my garden and flowers continue to battle the heat and wind, with the heat and wind winning.
The last week it cooled down some, and by that, I mean it’s not 100 degrees anymore, which is unusual for Kansas in July. I’m not complaining though. Not only are we able to get in some needed outdoor work without melting, but my flowers on the deck have really bounced back and my garden is on a growth spurt. The remaining lettuce in my garden, which had started to turn brown around the edges, even has greened back up and has grown tremendously in the last couple of days. I’d better get back out there and get some more work down before it heats back up. Here’s a photo showing the progress on the garden so far…Happy gardening!!!

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